Urban Pilón, Recalling Roots to Lead a Chicago Culinary Movement

If there’s one utensil that’s been historically essential in Latin American cuisine, it’s the pilón. In the late 15th century, the Taíno indians who occupied the West Indies were documented to have used many variations of the pilón for cooking, sometimes made out of large hollowed out tree trunks. Today, variations of that same utensil line the walls of Roberto Pérez’s kitchen to fuel his own culinary movement, Urban Pilón.

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